American Pastors Network Debuts New ‘Stand in the Gap’ Television Program Today on Upliftv

Beginning today, “Stand in the Gap” TV, which analyzes transcending cultural issues from a biblical worldview perspective and which most deem difficult to navigate, will air on Upliftv through DirecTV Channel 379, Frontier Communications, Buckeye Broadband, Consolidated Communications and Hotwire Communications. Learn more about Upliftv here.

“Our prayerful intent is that this program will bring clarity to cultural confusion and make sense of the nonsense around us,” said APN President and “Stand in the Gap” host Sam Rohrer. “‘Stand in the Gap’ TV focuses on root problems and applies biblical principles so God’s people can know the truth. God’s Word holds the answer to every issue. We believe that, and He does mean what He says. Each week, we’ll take the newspaper in one hand and the Bible in the other, and present solutions and answers to the most controversial and complex issues of the day.”

“Stand in the Gap” TV will air at 3:30 p.m. Tuesdays and noon Thursdays on Upliftv, reaching a potential of 24 million households nationally.

In April, “Stand in the Gap” debuted Sunday afternoons on WBPH-TV60, a television station in the Philadelphia market that reaches a potential of 7 million viewers in the greater Philadelphia region by cable, DirecTV, Dish Network, off air antenna and online. The program airs on WBPH at 3 p.m. Sundays and is rebroadcast at 8 p.m. Tuesdays and 7:30 p.m. Thursdays.

“Stand in the Gap” TV also airs on WVCY-America TV 30 in the Milwaukee market. The show airs several times throughout the week in southeast Wisconsin on DirecTV Channel 30/950; Dish Channel 30/7707, cable, antenna and at vcyamerica.org/tv30.

Rohrer is a former businessman, 18-year Pennsylvania state legislator and candidate for governor. He is a regular guest on national radio and TV, speaking on a wide range of public policy issues including the biblical role of government, the dangers of Islam, the organized homosexual lobby and the defense of marriage.

Co-hosting with Rohrer is Isaac Crockett, pastor of Hamburg Bible Church. He has had the opportunity to travel throughout the U.S., preaching and teaching in hundreds of churches and Christian schools, as well as five foreign countries. Crockett has also worked as a social worker and substitute teacher.

 

Learn more about “Stand in the Gap” TV here or view a promo for the show here.

American Pastors Network: Kavanaugh Opposition Wants to Kill Process Like They Kill Unborn Babies

This week’s Brett Kavanaugh Supreme Court confirmation hearings have been called a “circus,” a “national disgrace” and something straight out of “The Twilight Zone.”

The deeply dramatic hearing and the accusations against Kavanaugh that go with it have deep ties to the pro-life/pro-abortion debate in America, says the American Pastors Network (APN). Many, adds APN President Sam Rohrer, fear—or, in some cases, hope—that Kavanaugh’s appointment to the SCOTUS bench could mean a reversal of the 1973 landmark Supreme Court decision Roe v. Wade, which legalized abortion in America.

“These hearings and the consequences of them could have massive impact on the range of pro-life concerns in our United States,” Rohrer said. “For those who fear God and hold to the sacredness of life, we must understand that the current fight being waged by the opponents of Brett Kavanaugh is far less of an opposition to him as it is their consuming fear of losing the legal right to continuing to murder unborn babies.”

Rohrer added that pro-abortion supporters dread not having access to abortion-on-demand, in some cases, paid for with taxpayer dollars.

“Amid the circus and national disgrace of the Kavanaugh hearings, it’s become obvious that the Kavanaugh opposition seems to salivate over the prospects of killing justice generally and an orderly confirmation process specifically for Supreme Court Justices, as this opposition has defended and rejoiced over the killing of more than 60 million unborn babies in the past 45 years! After all, why not pursue the abortion of justice and the death of the process if you’re devoted to the abortion of millions of defenseless young lives?”

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American Pastors Network Helps Pastors Navigate the Challenge of ‘Preaching in Perilous Times’

Pastors can sometimes feel isolated, being just one among a flock with a specific set of responsibilities and concerns.

The American Pastors Network (APN) aims to alleviate some of these feelings of isolation by offering both in-person and virtual events where pastors can come together, gain insight from each other and share their ideas and experiences.

A recent APN conference call among pastors focused on the topic of “Preaching in Perilous Times,” and APN president Sam Rohrer says these types of gatherings help pastors to know there are others facing their same challenges.

“We were not only honored to host this pastors’ conference call aptly titled ‘Preaching in Perilous Times,’ but we as a pastors network take it seriously to enable pastors to lead their churches in the best way they possibly can, and this means by preaching the whole counsel of God and giving the people in the pews insight into how they can look at today’s issues from both a biblical and constitutional basis,” Rohrer said.

The call highlighted several pastors who are part of the network. Keith Wiebe, APN’s vice president of state chapter development, posed several questions and participants on the call were also able to interact during a time of Q&A. A few of the questions and answers from the call are highlighted below:

QUESTION: George Barna’s research tells us that just 30 percent of pastors actually believe in the absolute authority of Scripture. How has preaching changed over the past few years?

ANSWER: Gary Dull, pastor of Faith Baptist Church, Altoona, Pa.: “God’s concept of preaching has never changed, God’s message to the preacher has never changed, but one of the things that concerns me is that down through the years, a lot of preaching has become what I refer to as a ‘cupcake’ sermon. In other words, preachers will preach that which looks good, sounds good, maybe even tastes good but it has very, very little spiritual nourishment. I’m very concerned about that because I think we need to do as Paul said—to preach good sound doctrine—and some of these ‘cupcake’ sermons today do not do that.”

Q: How has the audience changed? Have their expectations, needs and interests changed?

A: Dull: “The needs will never change from generation to generation because of the spiritual aspect of the individual’s life are all aboard in sin. We all need a Savior, and we all need to grow. I began pastoring in February of 1974, and when I started out, there was a lot of interest in sound doctrine from the pew. People wanted to know what the Bible really said, to understand the doctrine, who God is, what God expects and how God operates. What I have found down through the years is that people in the pew have gotten away from the desire to have sound doctrine preached to them. They’re more interested in having messages that teach them how to do this and how to do that. Those come by way of practical application, but if doctrine is not first of all established in their hearts and minds of people, then living is not going to be right.”

Q: What challenges are faced in training young preachers—shaping their thinking and molding their preaching?

A: Nathan Crockett, professor at Bob Jones University, Greenville, S.C.: “When they come as freshmen, we’re amazed at … their lack of biblical understanding. I tell them to turn to a certain passage and they’re fumbling around, partly because they are used to the cell phone. Before you can preach God’s Word to others, you have to understand it yourself. They may be very familiar with the world in which they live, but they have to understand the world of the Bible and actually have biblical knowledge and understanding to be able to get that information to the audience they’re preaching to.”

Q: Describe the preaching burden God has given you for a multiethnic, multicultural setting.

A: Joe Green, pastor of Antioch Assembly, Harrisburg, Pa.: “Our motto is to promote and protect the image of God. I believe that that’s our calling and the church’s calling as a whole. As we examine the image and the likeness of God, which we are made in, I look at the trinity: God the Father, God the Son, God the Holy Spirit, which includes unity in the midst of diversity. I’m always careful to mention unity in the midst of diversity and not unity in spite of diversity, because a lot of times when we come together from a multicultural perspective, we want to take the person out of their cultural experience and background and make them more like us.”

Q: Why are messages on a biblical worldview important to address from the pulpit?

A: Mike Frazier, pastor of Canton Baptist Temple, Canton, Ohio: “I think in churches across America, there’s a little bit of a disconnect between what I would call ‘Sunday Christianity’ and then their weekly Christianity. They might affirm a way of believing on Sunday but then often their lives do not reflect that biblical understanding throughout the rest of the week. I felt it very critical to deal with the subject of having a biblical worldview. I dealt with the importance of it and how to cultivate a biblical mindset. We talked about how a biblical worldview all begins in Genesis Chapters 1 and 2 and how a biblical worldview helps you to understand the mess we’re in today all across America and in the world. We also talked about a biblical worldview and how it pertains to salvation. That’s where it all begins and how a is person saved—how really thinking biblically sets us apart from the rest of the world. It was Jesus who said in John 17:17: ‘Sanctify them through thy truth.’ The idea of sanctifying is to set apart, to distinguish. If we can get our people to think biblically, we can get them to live biblically. If I can help you to do that on Sunday and then to get you to live out the truth of God’s word throughout the rest of the week, we can truly be the salt of the earth and the light of the world that He’s called us to be.”

Accusers and Accusations: What Is at Risk in the Kavanaugh Hearings?

As the nation continues to be captivated by the Judge Brett Kavanaugh hearings and the accusations that have come forward, the American Pastors Network is looking at the biblical principles that should be guiding the entire process—especially considering the great impact on the future of the country.

APN president Sam Rohrer discussed the matter on yesterday’s “Stand in the Gap Today” program, the radio ministry of the American Pastors Network.

Rohrer said few are considering the biblical principles that are at the basis of both the legal and moral crux of a confirmation hearing such as this one.

“Contrary to what many may believe, there is a biblical principle that is, in fact, part of our law, and, frankly, this principle is at the core of what the American Pastors Network communicates and what the ‘Stand in the Gap’ programming aims to share. The very basis of our justice system—our law—comes right off the pages of Old Testament Scripture. The Book of Deuteronomy speaks exactly to what every legislator, every Congressman, every Senator and every lawyer should be thinking about right now—that every lawmaker who gives credence to unproven accusations are indicting themselves because they are participating in very bad justice and very bad law.”

Rohrer shared Deuteronomy 19:15-19 (ESV): “A single witness shall not suffice against a person for any crime or for any wrong in connection with any offense that he has committed. Only on the evidence of two witnesses or of three witnesses shall a charge be established. If a malicious witness arises to accuse a person of wrongdoing, then both parties to the dispute shall appear before the LORD, before the priests and the judges who are in office in those days. The judges shall inquire diligently, and if the witness is a false witness and has accused his brother falsely, then you shall do to him as he had meant to do to his brother. So you shall purge the evil from your midst.”

“False accusations, false witnesses and false testimony, God says, are evil, and unless purged, brought into the light and the false accuser identified and punished swiftly and appropriately, the entire justice system is brought down,” Rohrer said. “And when The Washington Post or a Diane Feinstein sits on an accusation by one person alone, from a long time ago, it makes it even worse. Worse yet, our lawmakers and leaders do not recognize that one witness could be a false fitness; when play along with it, they are part of the dismantling of our justice system, and they would be as a part of what this verse says: ‘They are a part of an evil that must be purged.’

“This is a serious matter because our entire justice system hangs upon it,” Rohrer added. “It’s been attempted before, but now, I’m afraid, it’s being attempted with abandon. It’s dreadfully perilous for our system of justice. Senators who are clamoring for a single witness to be heard without demanding other witnesses come forward as well are violating important processes that already exist within the law. We’re in dangerous times when such things are even allowed to occur.”

Listen to an audio clip of this important discussion on “Stand in the Gap Today” here.

Photo by Claire Anderson on Unsplash

Support for Christians Refusing to Use God-Given Talents at Same-Sex Weddings Increases

Masterpiece Cakeshop owner Jack Phillips is tangled in controversy again, despite winning his case at the U.S. Supreme Court. In the wake of Phillips’ victory, Christianity Today is highlighting a new PRRI survey that found that while public support for same-sex marriage has never been higher, “Americans are increasingly sympathetic to service refusals by bakers, caterers, florists and other small business owners with conservative religious beliefs.”

The survey found that 46 percent believe “owners of wedding-related businesses should be allowed to refuse their services to same-sex couples based on their religious convictions” up from 2017, when just 41 percent felt the same.

Sam Rohrer, president of one of the largest pastors groups in the country—the American Pastors Network (APN)—talks frequently about religious liberties on the daily “Stand in the Gap Today” radio program and the weekly “Stand in the Gap” TV show.

“It’s encouraging that more Americans are realizing that individuals have the right to refuse certain services based on their closely held religious convictions,” Rohrer said. “One could argue that baking a cake or taking photographs is a form of art, and therefore, a piece of that person’s God-given talents is being used for something that is not only against their beliefs, but against the biblical teaching about God’s design for marriage between one man and one woman.”

Photo by Photos by Lanty on Unsplash

Should I Stay or Should I Go?

A new survey from the Pew Research Center gives some insight into why Americans decide to attend church services in their communities—or skip church altogether and stay home.

Reported in Christianity Today, the research identified 10 reasons why people might attend religious services and eight reasons why they might not.

The American Pastors Network (APN, www.americanpastorsnetwork.net) says that whether or not these reasons are valid, pastors and church leaders must be aware of what drives people to church or keeps them away.

The top reasons American churchgoers seek out fellowship and worship in a church setting include: Becoming closer to God (81%), so their children will have a moral foundation (69%), to become a better person (68%), for comfort in times of trouble or sorrow (66%), they find the sermons valuable (58%), to be part of “a community of faith” (57%), to follow family’s religious traditions (37%), a feeling of religious obligation (31%), socializing and meeting new people (19%) or pleasing their spouse or family (16%).

“We can see from these reasons that the culture has pervaded, as least on some level, why people go to church,” Rohrer said. “But whatever the reasons, pastors should be thankful these souls have chosen to come through the doors of God’s house and are at least cognizant of the fact that’s where they should be on Sunday mornings or throughout the week. From this knowledge, pastors then have insight as to what brings people out to worship, learn more about Him and open God’s Word. And while pastors must not cater to these reasons to keep people in church, they can present them with the whole counsel of God and the unwavering truth of the Gospel, as well as biblical guidance on our most pressing societal issues.”

Even though the survey also found that the top reason churchgoers head to a service is to become closer to God, one in five adults who attend monthly or more also said they do not usually feel God’s presence; one in four don’t usually feel a sense of community; and four in 10 don’t usually feel connected to their faith’s history.

Additionally, Pew reported a decline in attendance at religious services from 2007 to 2014, with about a third of Americans now saying they worship weekly and about a third saying they go rarely or never.

Of those who do not attend services, the reasons include: they practice their faith in other ways (37%), are not believers (28%), haven’t found a church or other house of worship they like (23%), don’t like the sermons (18%), don’t feel welcome (14%), don’t have time (12%), are in poor health (9%) or there isn’t a church for their religion in their area (7%). More than a quarter (26%) said there is not one most important reason they don’t attend church.

The Rise of Islam in America— Answering the Unasked Questions

Many Christians may not realize that Islam affects them personally, as well as their communities, their churches and the nation.

The American Pastors Network (APN, www.americanpastorsnetwork.net) is aiming to share more information about the rise of Islam in America, answering the questions that many may be fearful or too intimidated to ask.

Several weeks ago, APN debuted its new weekly television program, “Stand in the Gap,” which considers transcending cultural issues, seemingly difficult to navigate, from a biblical worldview perspective each Sunday afternoon.

On yesterday’s program, which will be rebroadcast at 8 p.m. Tuesday, July 24, and 7:30 p.m. Thursday, July 26, Rohrer and co-host Isaac Crockett welcomed Dr. Mark Christian, a former Egyptian Imam with family ties to the Muslim Brotherhood. On a series of three programs, the second and third airing July 29 and Aug. 5, respectively, Christian and Rohrer will discuss how Islam has infiltrated the American culture, what the implications are, and what pastors and churches must know to respond appropriately.

“Islam has already shown its intention to destroy America by any means necessary,” said APN President Sam Rohrer. “But are we aware of all the ways this insidious invasion is already taking place? We hope this new effort from APN and ‘Stand in the Gap’ TV will help Christians learn behind-the-scenes details from those who know: Christians who are devoted American patriots, but who were once Muslims, and are sometimes very close to the decision makers and influencers behind the global caliphate strategies.”

Dr. Mark Christian is now the founder and president of the Global Faith Institute. He is a former Muslim from Cairo who served as an Imam from the age of 13. Christian left Islam at the age of 25 after researching the life of Muhammad and the teachings of the Quran and became convinced that his Muslim faith was a lie. He wandered spiritually for the next 10 years, ultimately discovering that Jesus Christ was the answer he was seeking.

“Islam has targeted America and is spreading through deception as to what it believes, its goals and its strategies,” Rohrer said. “We are honored to welcome Dr. Mark Christian to help establish the historical and the political foundations of Islam, the goals of Islam, the definition of Sharia, the distinctions between Islam and ‘radical Islam,’ whether Islam is compatible with the U.S. Constitution and much more. An expert on Islam, Dr. Christian provides his testimony as well as his insight on how Islam is spreading, details about the Muslim Brotherhood, who the average Muslim person is and what they believe and why America has been targeted.”

View more about each of the three programs:

* The Rise of Islam in America—Part I: “Answering the Unasked Questions”—establishing the foundation clarifying points about Islam. View the full program.

* The Rise of Islam in America—Part II: “The Crumbling American Church”—identifying the Islamic strategy to infiltrate and silence the American church. View the promo.

* The Rise of Islam in America—Part III: “The Complicit American Culture”—identifying the Islamic strategy to infiltrate and silence the American culture. View the promo.

“This is perhaps the issue of greatest threat to America and our freedom as we know it,” Rohrer added. “Yet it is an issue very few talk about for fear they be identified and labeled as ‘haters.’ But to every American citizen, and particularly to every American Christian, Islam will not, through ignorance or false hope, simply go away. In fact, this is the one driving issue that if not properly understood—and very soon—will destroy America and snuff out the light of truth and freedom in our shining city on the hill and usher in incredible persecution.”

Photo by Senor Sosa on Unsplash

Churchgoers Stay for the Theology, Not the Music or the Pastor

The results of a new survey from Lifeway Research may come as a surprise to pastors and worship leaders.

The study found that most churchgoers will put up with a change in music style or a different preacher, but they will choose to leave a church if the foundational beliefs are tampered with.

These findings can serve as a wake-up call, says the American Pastors Network to pastors who may be trying to reach people through music, programs, or style rather than the substance of the Gospel.

“It is crucial that American churches return to the core of the Gospel—the true focus of who and what the church should be,” said APN President Sam Rohrer. “Today’s pastors can get caught up in the style of music, programs offered, the environment, and even how leaders dress. While these things may deserve some attention, they should not be the focus. The foundation of the church must be its theological position and how strongly it is rooted in the Word of God. Rightfully so, the people in the pews realize this.”

According to the survey, most churchgoers are committed to staying at their current church for the long haul, but more than half of respondents (54 percent) said they would strongly consider leaving if the church’s core beliefs or doctrine changed.

Perhaps the reasoning for staying at a current church is that, for the most part, churchgoers say they agree with their church’s teaching. About half (52 percent) say their beliefs are completely aligned with those of the church; 42 percent say their beliefs are mostly aligned.

“We see many churches today wrestling with what should be foundational beliefs for any church, such as God’s definition of marriage, his design for sexuality and gender, and many other cultural and societal issues,” Rohrer added. “While churches must maintain biblical positions on these matters and address them from the pulpit, it is a grave mistake for them to change their foundational beliefs in order to welcome more people, appease more members, or otherwise engage the culture.”

Of the 1,000-plus surveyed, 35 percent have been at their church between 10 and 24 years, and 27 percent have been there for 25 years or more—meaning that most church members have been at their church longer than the pastor. Just under 40 percent have been at their current church for nine years or fewer. Overall, 15 percent of churchgoers say they have thought about going to another church in the past six months. Eighty-five percent say they have not.

Besides a change in church doctrine, churchgoers say several other reasons might cause them to switch:

  • 48 percent would change churches if they moved to a new home
  • 19 percent if the preaching style changed
  • 12 percent if the pastor left
  • 10 percent if a family member wanted a new church
  • 9 percent would leave over politics
  • 6 percent would leave if they didn’t feel needed
  • 5 percent if the music style changed
  • 4 percent if they had a conflict
  • 3 percent if a friend stopped attending

Photo by Jonathan Simcoe on Unsplash

Are You “Christian” or “A Christian”?

Perhaps more than ever before, “church” is making headlines, whether it is about denominational division, pastor scandal or how religion plays into politics. But regardless, says the American Pastors Network, the core focus of the American church has strayed.

“Why are we talking about denominations?” asks APN President Sam Rohrer. “How does it affect both believers and nonbelievers? What responsibility do denominational leaders have? For one, there is a branding problem within denominations—older churchgoers want it, while the younger do not. But the question remains: Is Christianity any longer a brand? Church is now a social gathering of like-minded people. Can any of these people identify—or do they want to identify—with the things that are genuinely Christian, or with what the Bible says about the most pressing issues of our day? The answer is no.”

It is crucial, Rohrer added, that American churches return to the core of the Gospel. The foundations of denominations are being lost because of salacious headlines, which take away from the true focus of who and what the church should be.

“Christianity is becoming a way of worship that allows us to lead a moral life and be a good person, but we are pushing out the power of God and His Word,” Rohrer said. “Research shows that true Bible-believing Christians are becoming less and less. ‘Christian’ can mean: ‘I believe the Bible but never open it, I believe in the flag, I believe in the Constitution.’ But being a true Christ-follower is much different. It’s ‘being a Christian’ versus ‘being Christian.’”

APN recently debuted its new television program, “Stand in the Gap,” which considers transcending cultural issues, seemingly difficult to navigate, from a biblical worldview perspective. “Stand in the Gap” TV also seeks to bring clarity to cultural confusion and makes sense of the nonsense around us, focusing on the root problems of our nation and applies biblical principles so God’s people can know the truth.

“Stand in the Gap” TV airs weekly on WBPH-TV60, a station in the Philadelphia market that reaches a potential of 7 million viewers by cable, DirecTV, Dish Network, off-air antenna, and online. Programs air at 3pm ET Sundays and will be rebroadcast Tuesdays at 8pm and Thursdays at 7:30pm Check the WBPH listings for more information on how to watch. here or view a promo for the show Learn more about the program.

Photo by Ben White on Unsplash

Are Today’s Churches “Of the Culture” or “In the Culture”?

Much has been made recently about America’s mainline church denominations—the changes, division and uncertainty within.

But the American Pastors Network’s says the focus should be on something else—getting back on the basics of Christianity.

“Christians must unite around the core of the gospel, not divide because of man-made denominations,” said APN President Sam Rohrer. “Above all, the focus must be on how to communicate the Gospel. Churches can change their music, change the way the pastor dresses, or change the public statements, but many of today’s churches are walking away from the authority of Scripture and the necessity of protecting the authority of God’s Word. That never grows old, and no one can change that without directly attacking the Word of God. Bit by bit, we are collectively retreating from a hard, fast, and firm commitment to Scripture, and searching for ways to make it more palatable to the next generation—whatever that might look like.”

Another damaging matter, Rohrer added, is churches desiring to or giving into the allure of being of the culture rather than in the culture, ultimately straying from the Gospel to meet cultural needs.

“Many churches are trying to change to become like the culture, but the long-term effects of leaving the Gospel will be damaging beyond belief,” he said. “Many elements have pervaded our country’s denominations, such as transgenderism, same-sex marriage, sexual assault, and social justice, just to name a few. The Left loves to see the divide of some of the largest of these denominations, which are doing much self-promotion, inviting media to be part of the ‘experience’ and by moving away from traditional church business and opening the doors of today’s critiques of Christianity, either through the mainstream media or social media. And all the discord is playing out in public, which is not helping the spread of the Gospel one bit.”

APN recently debuted its new television program, “Stand in the Gap,” which considers transcending cultural issues, seemingly difficult to navigate, from a biblical worldview perspective. “Stand in the Gap” TV also seeks to bring clarity to cultural confusion and makes sense of the nonsense around us, focusing on the root problems of our nation and applies biblical principles so God’s people can know the truth.

“Stand in the Gap” TV airs weekly on WBPH-TV60, a station in the Philadelphia market that reaches a potential of 7 million viewers by cable, DirecTV, Dish Network, off-air antenna, and online. Programs air at 3pm ET Sundays and will be rebroadcast Tuesdays at 8pm and Thursdays at 7:30pm Check the WBPH listings for more information on how to watch. here or view a promo for the show Learn more about the program.

Photo by Nina Strehl on Unsplash